Blog Archives

April Tweets & Pins

Here’s the monthly roundup of our favorite tweets and pins for your perusing pleasure. Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Pinterest if you like what you see!

tweet pin

Astronomers pinpoint the exact date and time that Monet’s “Sunset” was painted.
This penguin slips on the ice and then I’m pretty sure he cusses.
What happens to your body without a spacesuit? NOTHING GOOD
Animal Planet’s “Call of the Wildman” is accused of animal mistreatment.
Photos: Camera-trapped predators of India.
Teach yourself to dream lucidly but, uh, watch out for the demons.
Spectacular renditions of superheroes in Pacific Northwestern indigenous art styles.
Two snakes of the same species can have surprisingly different venoms.
Video: 1-year old anteater has a fuzzy freakout over a log. You’re welcome.
Monsanto is returning to cross-breeding plants because people think GMOs are icky.

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January Tweets & Pins

Here’s the monthly roundup of our favorite tweets and pins for your perusing pleasure. Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Pinterest if you like what you see!

tweet pin

This trout ate a whole bunch of shrews. Wut.
Your eyeballs will love this list of beautiful moths.
A phenomenon known as ‘earthquake lights‘ may be linked to rift zones.
More than 300 sharks armed with transmitters tweet (as in, on Twitter) when they get near the beach.
The cancer-resistant and spectacularly ugly Naked Mole Rat was named Vertebrate of the Year.
An ancient tree-dwelling critter is the great grandmommy of the carnivore family.
Here’s Optimus Prime made out of gingerbread.
Flowers are blooming in New York.
Here are some animals that handled the polar vortex LIKE A BOSS.
This ancient piece of amber contains flowers frozen in the act of reproduction, giving botanists studying the origin of flower sex a reason to party.

Tweets & Links

I found these two fun nuggets and thought I’d share them with you here since I tweeted them earlier today.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology did this nifty little study to see if Black-Capped Chickadees would be more interested in nesting in tubes rather than houses, since tubes better resemble their preferred nesting sites of excavated snags. The results? They way preferred the tubes over traditional bird houses! So if you’re into providing nests for your birds, especially cavity nesters like chickadees, you may be inspired to try this method out. I bet with some glue and tree bark, those PVC tubes could look AWESOME.

NatGeo did a little report on a study published in 2005 in the journal Ecology Letters that looked at why some bird eggs are speckled when the speckles provide no camouflage. It turns out that the building blocks of the speckles’ darker pigmentation acts like a glue in areas of the eggshell that are weaker from calcium deficiency. NEATO!

And this.

Taken from somewhere on ICanHasCheezburger.

Nature News & Tweets for December

So, since only the primitive portion of my brain (responsible for breathing and peeing in a private facility rather than on the floor) is functioning from four days of poor nutrition and an awful lot of Netflix Instant, I thought I’d share some neato things going on in the world of.. well. The world.

A 400,000 year old tooth was discovered in Israel. One doc says “HUMAN!”, another says “Probably not, you over-zealous sonofabitch.” Typical. (According to the article, the oldest Homo sapiens tooth discovered so far is half that old so if it IS human, well, it’s a big deal.) I’d like to suggest that for just a few minutes, sit back and picture what it would be like to have another HOMINID SPECIES (not another race, culture, or other kind of group) wandering around. Another hominid species. Hominid. Mind-blowing.

Tickling may have some evolutionary benefit. Or at least, it may have used to. It may have been a way for families and friends to bond and taught youngsters to protect vulnerable parts of their bodies during play-fighting, like the neck and belly. Primates that participate in tickling pant a certain way, and the article suggests we may have the roots of modern-day laughter in this vocal behavior. Still doesn’t explain why I occasionally laugh so hard that I pee my pants.

Ed Yong reports on research that points to the absorption of marine bacteria into human guts to help process sushi. Japanese people utilize seaweed like nori in a variety of dishes, and the high prevalence of seaweed in their evolutionary diets provided for sushi-eating bacteria to enter into – and survive! – their digestive tracts. Which means that Japanese people can actually better digest seaweeds thanks to a bacteria that wasn’t originally there (and isn’t there in other groups). Unfortunately there are no cupcake-eating bacteria that can help me with my, erm, problem.

Bryan over at FieldHerper wows me again with his intense photos. It was hard to pick just one to highlight, but I’m SERIOUSLY partial to thunderstorm photos. I swear to God his photos are like naturalist porn. (Maybe that brings to mind something different than I’m thinking. That would be weird. *ponder* Super weird.)

HAPPY TUESDAY!! :)