Blog Archives

[Bird Video Series] #5: Bower Birds Love Blue

Bower Birds Love Blue concludes our week of bird videos! As a visual person, I find it nice sometimes to take a break from reading and processing, and just watch the behaviors in their natural settings. I hope you’ve enjoyed these clips too.

Bower Birds are known for several things: 1) amassing a lot of stuff with which to impress their potential mates, 2) erecting impressive structures out of sticks (complete with support beams) and 3) stealing blue things from humans.

This is a group of species that go to an enormous amount of trouble to attract and please a mate: with Bower Birds, it’s not just about having good-looking feathers. Some species build piles of beetle wings that iridesceĀ in the light, while others thatch entry ways in which they hope to mate. Today you get two videos, and I won’t apologize for featuring David again. I just won’t.

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Weekly Photo Wunderbar

Even though winter is a hard time for me (the long, dark hours make it hard to do anything but sleep and read books) – like a lot of people – autumn possesses some very real magic. What I notice the most is that the increasingly sideways position of the sun casts a beautiful slanted light onto everything, and some days it feels like a perpetual sunset.

Besides that, the colors that come through in deciduous plants is breathtaking and if I’m not careful, I go driving off the side of the road, entranced. Big fat clouds, sometimes thick and dark with rain, roll through, creating a drama of light that is unparalleled in any other season. I’m not very good at capturing it on (what we used to call) film, but I give it my best. (And then completely oversaturate everything post-process, really, so that it will match how I see it in real life: full, deep, and rich.)

Few things scream autumn like the fire of an aspen tree against a blue sky.

I See You. In Color.

Color vision is something that you, like me, probably take for granted on a daily basis, unless you’re a part of the 8% of men or 0.5% of women that are color blind. Seeing color sets us apart from some other mammals, and places us in a group with a variety of invertebrates, reptiles, birds, and more!

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