Monthly Archives: May 2014

May Berry Go Round

Hello friends! Ah, spring time – the busiest season of all. And so it was this month that most of the plant writers were otherwise preoccupied with their plant obsessions! May’s Berry Go Round is a bit slim, but I hope you enjoy these articles on important backyard garden plants/considerations. You can visit the main Berry Go Round here site for more information about carnivals and becoming a carnival host.

Benjamin Vogt inspired me to start thinking about important backyard plants and practices with this quote: “I feel that my backyard habitat is critically important (in the face of such large-scale environmental degradation).” And it’s true: each of us with any amount of outdoor space, be it a patio or a thousand acres, has the opportunity to support life: plant life, insect life, possibly even animal life and full microhabitat life. You can read the article here at the Native Plants & Wildlife Gardens blog.

I also love this article by Carole Sevilla Brown called “Are Wildlife Gardeners Real Gardeners?”

This article from Mother Nature’s Backyard explores making your garden water-wise and “life-friendly!”

New Under the Sun has a particular preference for a prickly perennial known as Yellow Thistle.

Emma the Gardener wrote about a popular permaculture plant: comfrey!

Check out a gorgeous, rare species on Gravity’s Rainbow blog and learn how to help protect its specialized habitat.

If you’re interested in learning more, the first thing you can do is find out how to support native plants in your habitat. Native plants support pollinating insects, which in turn support native birds and mammals. Conserve water by getting rid of needless lawn space and plants that aren’t fit for your climate, particularly if you live in a dry one. Most of all, get into your green space and connect – deeply and fully – to nature and the great circle of life we’re all a part of! :) Thanks for joining me.

 

 

 

 

 

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Vintage Nature Illustration Wednesday – Mosses & Lichens

David Goddard 1978

David Goddard 1978

Curio Cabinet: Myrtlewood

CC myrtlewood

The Curio Cabinet series (#curioTuesday) is published biweekly, featuring an artifact of natural or cultural history and a brief selection of nifty facts. Curio Cabinet celebrates the history of curio collections, the roots of which played a part in the globalization of learning and scientific knowledge. Learn more here. Read the rest of this entry

{Book Review} The Backyard Homestead by Carleen Madigan

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Rodale offers a free trial of this book, click on the pic

The Backyard Homestead, edited by Carleen Madigan

I got this book because I wanted a nice, well-rounded introduction to producing food, livestock, and other edibles on my property, regardless of the size of my property, and I wanted it to appeal to someone who really didn’t know much about the topic.

Read the rest of this entry

Vintage Nature Illustration Wednesday – Spring Birds

Ron King 1965

Ron King 1965

Wildlife Rehab Diary: Godzilla the Lonely Squirrel

Many wildlife babies come in sets: five baby squirrels, two baby foxes, thirteen baby opossums, two baby bears, three baby raccoons. Often, these animals will grow up to become relatively solitary, pairing up only for mating and rearing offspring, but while they’re young, they relish each other’s company. In fact, having siblings can be extremely helpful in learning how to associate with others of your own species: you can play with them, wrestle with them, steal food from them, and get disciplined by mom when you’re having a tussle with them.

Sometimes, a lone baby will arrive at the center because he’s been separated from his family by bad weather, a well-meaning human, or some other calamity. Such was the case of Godzilla the Lonely Squirrel. Read the rest of this entry

Curio Cabinet: Wing of the Luna Moth

CC luna moth wing

The Curio Cabinet series (#curioTuesday) is published biweekly, featuring an artifact of natural or cultural history and a brief selection of nifty facts. Curio Cabinet celebrates the history of curio collections, the roots of which played a part in the globalization of learning and scientific knowledge. Learn more here.

Read the rest of this entry

[Video] Time-Lapse Flowers for Your Spring Viewing Pleasure

Watching videos of time-lapse plants has some strange, magical effect on me. We take the miracle of plant life for granted because it moves at such a slower pace than we’re used to. Maybe that’s why time-lapse is so cool – it speeds up the life of a plant so we can recognize it on our own terms. At any rate, I wanted to share some of my favorite vids with you to celebrate spring, spring, the coming of spring! As a very cool extra, there’s a vid tucked in there of a pumpkin – from seed to scale, which, at the end, will blow your mind.

Turn up your speakers and watch them dance. Tell us which one you liked best in the comments!


10 points if you can catch the slug in this one!